Ricardo Otheguy

 

Ricardo Otheguy is professor of Linguistics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His work in theoretical and applied linguistics has appeared in major international journals such as Language, Language in Society, Spanish in Context, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, the Modern Language Journal, and the Harvard Educational Review. His publications in theoretical linguistics are in the areas of language contact, functional grammar, sociolinguistics, and the Spanish of the United States; in applied linguistics, his publications are in the area of bilingual education and the teaching of Spanish as a home language and as a second or foreign language. He is coauthor of Spanish in New York: Language Contact, Dialectal Leveling, and Structural Continuity; coeditor of Sign, meaning, and message: Perspectives on sign-based linguistics; and was founding editor of the journal Spanish in Context. Otheguy has developed textbook materials for the teaching of Spanish to Latino students in the United States and is coauthor of Tu Mundo: Curso para hispanohablantes. He has also written Spanish materials for English-speaking students and is coauthor of one the most widely used high school Spanish textbooks in the United States, Avancemos.

 

Professor Otheguy has participated in national and international conferences throughout the United States, Europe, and Latin America, and has lectured and conducted research in universities and research centers in numerous countries, including Cuba, Denmark, Germany, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Spain, and Uruguay. He has been a Fulbright visiting scholar in the Department of Linguistics at the University of the Republic in Montevideo, Uruguay, a visiting researcher in the School of Foreign Languages at the University of Havana, Cuba, and a researcher in residence at the Translators and Interpreters Services Team, also in Havana, Cuba.

 

Professor Otheguy is the founding director of CUNY’s Research Institute for the Study of Language in Urban Society, which conducts basic and applied research in urban linguistics, bringing to bear the research resources of the City University of New York on urban language issues. He has been principal investigator in projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the New York State Department of Education. His project on Spanish in New York has produced several corpus-based doctoral dissertations and a number of papers in major refereed linguistic journals. He holds a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the City University of New York as well as degrees and diplomas in Spanish from Louisiana State University, the City College of New York, and the University of Madrid, Spain.